+Dream
+Dream

Premiering on +DREAM is Lucy McRae's astounding performance film Delicate Spells of Mind, marking SIFA's foray into high-profile commissioning in the digital arena and emphasising SIFA's commitment to the virtual space as a stage for inspired artistic creation

+Eat
anise-sg
Anise (SG)

A hybrid digital art exhibition, music EP release and a secret performance by musician & illustration artists Anise.

Feb 2022 | Music
bunga-my
Bunga (MY)

Female hijab rap artist Bunga to consider the rituals in Asian hip hop music culture and to create a piece for it.

Feb 2022 | Music
cgccde-sg
CGCCDE (SG)

Debuting a new collaboration between 3 artists who has never worked with each other before.

Feb 2022 | Music
lenne-chai-sg
Lenne Chai (SG)

To give voice and express current thoughts of Gen Z stage performers, exploring diverse representations through a 5 minutes fashion film.

March 2022 | Movement
onlyjuan-x-arunditha-sg
OnlyJuan x Arunditha (SG)

To explore digitally sculpting and creating virtual poet-beings in collaboration with writer ad spoken word poet Arunditha (formerly Deborah Emmanuel)

April 2022 | Digital Beings
anki
ANKI

BY KIAT (SG) x LOOOP (USA)

Online | Programmes
dry-spell
Dry Spell

BY LENNE CHAI (SG) FT. BGOURD (SG)

Online | Programmes
the-paiseh-piece-a-poem-i-guess
THE PAISEH PIECE: A POEM, I GUESS

PHUA JUAN YONG (SG) X WEISH (SG)

Online | Programmes
ether
电子脉络 — ETHER

YEULE (SG)

Online | Programmes
farewell-angel
FAREWELL, ANGEL

SHELHIEL (MY)

Online | Programmes
re-re-re-re-re-re-ritual
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Ritual

By Cybercesspool (SG)  x deførmed (SG) x Claude Glass (SG)

Rituals are inherently rooted in repetition. Born from sequences of set actions performed time and time again, these gestures are prescribed a specific meaning upon its conception (if original) or adoption (if transmitted or inherited). Stretching across religious and cultural practises to tedious habits in the daily grind, these "rituals", mundane or uncommon, are ceaselessly reperformed, reproduced and replicated. As this repetition relentlessly continues, what then of the rituals' original or preceding meaning and significance? What is preserved and what is forgotten? What degrades and what thrives?

This work explores change in rituals and its inherent nature of repetition. Through articulations of distortion, warping and re-sampling visual and sonic media, it attempts to uncover, conceal and bask in a frenzy of meaning and non-meaning.

Online | Programmes
non-breaking-space
Non Breaking Space

BY Anise (SG) x Brandon Tay (SG)

Online | Programmes
+Eat

Bite-sized virtual art and multidisciplinary performances pieces featuring local and international artists. Curated by Syndicate.

+Read
little-histories-of-big-topics
Little Histories of Big Topics

Ahead of the festival, check out a series of essays that bring contextual colour to SIFA 2022’s performance offerings.

Release from Feb 2022 | Programmes
experiments-in-reciprocations
Experiments in Reciprocations

These longform creative responses – including text, photo essays, soundscapes, digital illustrations and audio commentary – bring reflection and perspective to the performances and performance spaces of SIFA 2022.  
 
Look out for striking images from documentary photographers Edwin Koo and Ore Huiying; soundscapes from sound designer Kenn Delbridge; a discussion on the creative process moderated by musician Samuel Wong; and insights from writers Dana Lam, Faris Joraimi, Justin Zhuang, Sheere Ng, as well as emerging regional voices who have been published in PR&TA, a journal of creative praxis in Southeast Asia.

Release from May 2022 | Programmes
tracing-witches
Tracing witches

by Hong Xinyi

composing-mepaan-constructing-collaboration-with-the-chinese-orchestra
Composing MEPAAN: Constructing collaboration with the Chinese orchestra

Moderated by Samuel Wong

crossing-over
Crossing Over

By Hong Xinyi


sound-listen-to-extinct-crickets-scrape-their-wings-together
Sound: Listen to Extinct Crickets scrape Their Wings Together
rain-historian
Rain Historian
tnh-afterimages
TNH Afterimages
ubin-paradise-lost-and-found
Ubin: Paradise Lost and Found
watching-a-3-way-thinking-about-project-salome
Watching a 3-way thinking about project SALOME
the-devil-in-our-everyday-lives
The Devil in Our Everyday Lives
dreaming-in-malay-bangsawan-gemala-malam-and-shakespeare-s-tropical-encounters
Dreaming in Malay: Bangsawan Gemala Malam and Shakespeare’s Tropical Encounters
the-house-is-open
The House is Open

Photographs by Ore Huiying
Soundscapes by Kenn Delbridge

voices-for-a-virtual-age-spirituality-technology-and-art-in-proto-and-remotes-x-quantum
Voices for a Virtual Age: Spirituality, Technology and Art in PROTO and Remotes x Quantum
needful-things
Needful things
sifa-x-oneirism-art-entangling-audience
SIFA X oneirism: Art Entangling Audience
the-meaning-of-rituals
The meaning of rituals

By Hong Xinyi


What do you miss?

Should we have worn lipstick every day, smiled more at strangers, luxuriated in moving between spaces all the while unheralded by electronic beeps, unencumbered by existential dread? Once we feasted like kings, on repasts unprologued by QR hieroglyphs. I miss the humanity of tangible menus; of a top-deck bus ride shared with faces unveiled in contemplation. I cherish the thought of someday buying an apple again without first taking out my phone. I promise I will always remember that this, all this, is joy.

These are such slight sorrows. The real ones don’t bear thinking about. But of course such a choice does not, should not, must not, exist.


What are your present rituals?

Do you know now, intimately, the distinct synthetic smell of a freshly unsealed surgical mask? Has your body proved pliable to the perhaps disjointed shape of your new circumstances? I am writing this with a crick in my neck because I no longer like to sit at desks. Have you ventured back into the world, weighing your desires against your fears? Was it worth it? Have you since sat in a cinema, or a theatre, or a concert hall, where vivid memories of amassed energies, of tidal laughter or choral roars, almost bridged the new distances between us? Do you remember the lush hush we used to make all of us together? Wasn’t it wonderful?


What rituals do you remember?

When a Chinese child turns one year old, some families will place a variety of objects within his or her reach, to see which item the child picks. This ritual is said to date back thousands of years, and I am convinced it has lasted so long because it sounds quite entertaining for everyone involved. Traditionally, it is believed (or hoped) that a child who grabs an abacus, for example, will grow up to run a business. Nowadays, you can put anything in the mix, really – a microphone if you hope for a superstar, a stethoscope for a doctor, perhaps a toy Bitcoin for a future tech bro. I am told I picked a book, which makes sense.

My family did not follow the old custom of placing only items related to cooking and sewing near a female child during this ritual. But some things do stick. At my grandmother’s funeral, we were instructed to line up according to seniority and gender as we went through the rites. I remember how the repeated reminders of these hierarchies coaxed shards of irritation from my skin. My mind started to invent new choreographies that prioritised instead the keenness of grief.  

But here’s the thing. Death often weaves a paradoxical cocoon of rawness and numbness around the living. The clarity and clamour of ritualised mourning can burrow past this   psychosomatic barrier, and find a sort of harmony with its atonal frequencies. Ritual can feel like a relief. Do this, then that. Bend, bow, breathe, rise. Okay. On the threshold of profound mysteries, we reach for shapes in the dark formed by others over time and try feel our way forward. What sort of person will a child grow up to be? What kind of life will a couple create together? Will a mother survive her labour? Will a hunter survive his hunt? When will the world return to us? How will I go on without you? Don’t know. But here – do this, then that. It’s a start; then we’ll see how. Okay.


What is the difference between a ritual and a performance?

It depends on who you ask, I guess. According to The Routledge Encyclopedia of Religious Rites, Rituals, and Festivals, there are those who believe that "all performance has at its core a ritual action".  

This is certainly true of Ceremonial Enactments, a performance in SIFA 2022’s opening weekend, in which three Singaporean companies re-imagine customs and rites from Singapore’s diverse cultures. Designer Max Tan draws on Chinese and Southeast Asian birth rituals; percussion ensemble Nadi Singapura weaves music, dance and narrative into the majlis persandingan wedding ceremony; dance icon Santha Bhaskar presents an ancient dance ritual performed in Hindu temples, which pays obeisance to the nine celestial custodians that guard the eight directions and the centre of the earth.

The inspirations are traditional, but the presentation will be contemporary. So, aesthetic choices are one way of potentially differentiating between a ritual and a performance.

But not everyone subscribes to the categorisation of ritual as traditional and performance as contemporary. For instance, anthropologist Karin Polit believes that rituals "are not only an integral part of modern societies, but can also be a means to construct alternative modernities", positing that “rituals are fields of discourse, where social positions are negotiated”.

Another way to look at things concerns you, the audience. Ritual theorists tend to see the audience of a ritual as passive, notes the same encyclopedia. "Performance theorists see every performance, whatever the genre, as a creation of the audience and the performers. They believe that if the performance is successful, the audience is transformed by it."

Debatable (not to mention a very tall order), but there you go — if the experience changes you profoundly, if you feel you helped to engender it, then it’s a performance rather than a ritual.


What new rituals shall we make together?

Because why not invent some new choreographies?

Psychoanalyst and novelist Sudhir Kakar has his own personal taxonomy for rituals — there are protective rituals that defend identity against perceived dangers, and transformative rituals that open one up to new experiences. The rituals that are able to combine these protective and transformative qualities, he writes, can create enchantment and sublimity. Perhaps the same can be said of performances, or of the myriad ways we can meet life’s profound mysteries.

This edition of SIFA is themed The Anatomy of Performance — Ritual. Some interesting people will be joining me in doing some adventurous anatomising, stitching the rituals of performance to our new realities. There’s no telling what's going to happen.

See you in a bit.

imagining-the-future
Imagining the future

By Hong Xinyi


What's out there?

In 2021, when many territorial borders on earth remained sealed to varying degrees, space tourism took off. The most high-profile flights were the ones launched by billionaires' companies — Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic, Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin, and Elon Musk's SpaceX.

The passengers on these flights included pilot Wally Funk, a member of an all-female cohort of privately funded American astronaut trainees in the 1960s, none of whom were chosen for space missions; Sian Proctor, an American scientist and artist; and Laura Shepard Churchley, daughter of astronaut Alan Shepard, who was the first American to travel into space.

These, and other guests, seemed to have been carefully chosen to underline the feel-good factor of these groundbreaking blast-offs. This was a new chapter in humanity's drive for exploration. And this time, the billionaires promised, everyone would be along for the ride. You know, at least symbolically. Whose bodies get to embody adventure? Whose bodies make history?

within-us-always
Within Us, Always

By Alena Murang

the-last-island
The Last Island

By Marcus Ng

It's easy to forget that Singapore is an island.

It's also easy to forget that Singapore isn't just one isle, but an archipelago of more than 65 islands.

And who can blame us, when we have lost much of what made Singapore an island. The closeness of the sea, a horizon that barely ends, the surge of the tide as the moon threatens to swamp the shore with each waxing — much of what makes an island feel like an island has been removed, and remains far removed, from our lives, as the city sprang forth and the strait shrank before it to swirl at the far end of a reclaimed coastline and the margins of landward minds.

We may not feel like islanders, but many still long for a sense of islandness. The pandemic put paid to weekends in Bali and Boracay, but millions still throng Sentosa, seeking perhaps a change of scenery or a certain solace in a game of chance. But the former Pulau Blakang Mati hardly feels like an island any more, now that a causeway binds it to Telok Blangah, and the thrills it offers, in its sanitised beaches and safe rides, are merely escapades rather than a true escape from the confines and comforts of the mainland.

Pulau Ubin receives but a fraction of Sentosa's visitors. A trip there is a journey that unravels from the start, as one joins a ferry line that moves to the whims of a weathered crew, steps into a launch that mirrors the foibles of its captain, sharing makeshift seats with weekend warriors on wheels and pilgrims to rocky shrines, and surrenders to the skills of the skipper as the vessel chugs down Changi Creek, its deck at the mercy of each passing wake and exposed to the sounds, scents and splashes of the northern strait in their estuarine glory.



Many of the 300,000 or so visitors – possibly more, in these deprived times – who land on Pulau Ubin each year are likely drawn to the novelty of Singapore's 'last village'. (This dubious title is shared with Kampong Lorong Buangkok off Yio Chu Kang Road, which is also an 'island' of rural holdouts in a sea of urban developments). But Pulau Ubin is also Singapore's 'last island'. Here, traces of islandness that have vanished from the main island linger on — in the village where sundry shops and seafood eateries stand with their backs to the tide; in mudflats and beaches that are not enclosed by stony walls; and in the isolation that comes from distance and separation. This sense of remove deepens, even alarms, as night falls and one sees the gulf between what passes for island life in the city, where everything is a given, and what it means to live, literally, on an island that enjoys no quarter from the elements and where gods and ghosts outnumber the living.

These aspects of islandness, with all their challenges and contradictions, will likely come to the fore as islanders and stakeholders wrestle with the future of Pulau Ubin, as well as what, and who, defines Singapore's 'last island'. In the longer durée, however, islands and islandness, in all their diversity and shifting dimensions, have shaped the fate and even the very notion of Singapore, which continues to make much of its islandness as a little red dot in a sea that is at once a lifeline and a source of existential dread. Far from being geographical footnotes at the bottom of the map, Singapore's islands could be said to chart the very beginnings of a maritime polity. Even today, many of these islands, especially those that support lighthouses, such as Pulau Satumu and Pedra Branca, serve as littoral assets that guard a strait of strategic significance.

Turn back the clock to the 17th century, and the western tip of Sentosa was already being fingered by Jacques de Coutre, a Flemish adventurer, as the ideal site for a Portuguese fort — nearly 250 years before the British built Fort Siloso on the same spot to defend their crown jewel in the east. This was because the island overlooked the only known passage then between the Melaka Straits and the South China Sea. Portuguese sailors were long familiar with Sentosa (which they dubbed blacan mati), as well as two nearby isles called Pulo Siquijan (now Pulau Sekijang Bendera and Pulau Sekijang Pelepah). These islands' names, which speak of 'death from behind' and a pair of barking deer, likely pre-date Western rutters and hail from a time when founding myths made their way into hazy but lasting collective memories.

Pulau Sekijang Bendera, now better known as St John's Island, embodies the myriad dimensions of islandness in Singapore. Its waters served as a safely distant staging ground before Raffles set a wary foot on the mainland in 1819. The island, a well-known maritime landmark for centuries, then housed a vital flagpost that advertised Singapore's status as a British port to passing ships.

Later, St John's Island was prized more for its isolation and distance. Between 1874 and 1976, it was a place of confinement for new migrants as well as questionable returnees suspected of harbouring infectious diseases. The qualities that made it an ideal quarantine station also lent the island to penal functions: in the 20th century, St John's Island became 'home' to prisoners-of-war, political detainees, opium addicts and boat people. The use, or misuse, of islands as penal sites was extended to Pulau Senang, an island near Raffles Lighthouse to which secret society members were exiled until a bloody riot in 1963; and Sentosa, where opposition politician Chia Thye Poh was housed from 1989 to 1992.

The closing of the quarantine station on St John's Island in 1976 unleashed a different side of islandness. This island became a place to get away from the denseness of the city, an escape from school and work routines in sanitary quarters-turned-campsites. In the same decade, other islands in the south, such as Pulau Sekijang Pelepah (now better known as Lazarus Island) and Pulau Sudong, were also designated as sites of recreation for a mainland horde.



This vision of islandness, however, had no room for an older layer of littoral life, as the islanders who had inhabited these shores for generations were forced to remove to high-rise flats. Still other southern isles that were home to traditional settlements not unlike those on Pulau Ubin – replete with schools, shops, suraus, shrines and peculiar inselic  histories – also shed this facet of islandness as Pulau Seking, Pulau Semakau, Pulau Bukom Kechil, Pulau Brani and the little archipelago that became Jurong Island gave way to container terminals, petrochemical complexes and an offshore landfill.

Today, the only island in the south to survive as a home is Kusu. There, the caretakers of two 19th-century shrines, one on the island's peak and the other on a rock below, still welcome pilgrims and maintain a mosaic of rituals that tread the lines between regional faiths. Old photographs of the island show a tenuous bar of sand that once linked the hilltop keramat and seaside temple, but this intertidal obstacle has long been buried under fill, as Kusu underwent an expansion that reduced its islandness with lawns, lagoons and other urban amenities. A similar fate befell coral islands such as the Sisters and Pulau Hantu, which had their fringing reefs buried under stone and soil, though new colonies have resurfaced in the decades since to reclaim artificial bays, reaching densities that draw regular dive boats and warrant the making of a marine park in the waters off Pulau Subar Darat and Pulau Subar Laut.
 
The islandness of Singapore's southern islands has shifted, faded, and faltered. They no longer serve as prisons, but beckon as getaways of last resort. Their rubble once formed the foundation of urban quays, by which bridges and monuments were erected with the blocks of a 'granite island'. Diminished by such contributions to nation-building, they continue to house facilities – industrial and municipal – that would mar the health and comforts of the main island.

In an earlier age, many of these islands were settled by the 'first peoples' of Singapore, who saw these waters not as barriers to freedom, but as a moveable feast that nourished their bodies, sheltered their families and connected them to friends and kin on other isles on both sides of the strait. And until this age of landlocked anxieties, these islanders even came to town, turning the basin off Clifford Pier into a carnival of sails and seamanship during an annual regatta that returned a sense of islandness to a city that was already starting to eye the world at large while losing sight of the isles in its midst.

What stories of islandness can one find on Pulau Ubin? What elements of islandhood remain on this sliver of granite and silt that has escaped the fate of its southern kin but must now endure the contestations of a post-modern crowd? What can the quarries, villages, mangroves and mudflats tell us about a space in flux, and whether Singapore's last island could, in our desperation to save or sustain it (for whom?), lose much of what makes it an island? Is there meaning in islands that exist in name but not in nature, and what do we gain in having a place where it's easy to forget that you are in Singapore, an island that feels like home but is never enough, where the sea and its spirits are kept at arm's length, always at war with the tides and at a loss with itself and its isles?

bangsawan-s-past-present-and-future
Bangsawan’s past, present and future

by Jamal Mohamad

+Read

A series of written articles and creative responses exploring the artistry and ideas explored in SIFA. Curated by Hong Xinyi.

+Grow
+Grow

Insight into individual artists' creative stances, strategies and perspectives.

+Discuss
queered-fabulations-fblive
Queered Fabulations: Worlding bodies in project SALOME

Gear up for SIFA with +DISCUSS, a series of recorded artist talks on Life Profusion. We've got an amazing line-up of chats with SIFA 2022 artists, hosted by our moderators Alfonse Chiu and Chong Gua Khee.

6 May, Fri, 7.30pm – 8.30pm | Promo
programme-discuss
+DISCUSS

Facilitating +DISCUSS is a cast of two select individuals – Alfonse Chiu and Chong Gua Khee – whose diverse interests and specialisations deepen and expand the conversation.

Online | Programmes
holding-on-and-letting-go-navigating-and-speculating-a-collective-path-through-bangsawan-gemala-malam-part-2
Holding On and Letting Go: Navigating and Speculating a Collective Path through Bangsawan Gemala Malam - Part 2

Bangsawan Gemala Malam can be described as crossing the worlds of Bangsawan and Shakespeare; the ‘traditional’ and the ‘contemporary’; and between the individual and the company/state/country. In Holding On and Letting Gothe featured artists share their personal and research journeys for the work, and reflect on what they each hold dear in this production that is the culminated effort of many.

Drop 3
holding-on-and-letting-go-navigating-and-speculating-a-collective-path-through-bangsawan-gemala-malam-part-1
Holding On and Letting Go: Navigating and Speculating a Collective Path through Bangsawan Gemala Malam - Part 1

Bangsawan Gemala Malam can be described as crossing the worlds of Bangsawan and Shakespeare; the ‘traditional’ and the ‘contemporary’; and between the individual and the company/state/country. In Holding On and Letting Go, the featured artists share their personal and research journeys for the work, and reflect on what they each hold dear in this production that is the culminated effort of many.

Drop 3
the-worlds-within-a-singularity-organising-voyages-of-perspectives-in-the-once-and-future-part-2
The Worlds Within a Singularity: Organising Voyages of Perspectives in The Once and Future - Part 2

The Worlds within a Singularity offers a glimpse into the varying perspectives and histories of the creative team behind The Once and Future, and the future voyages of the production following its premiere at SIFA 2022.

Drop 3
the-worlds-within-a-singularity-organising-voyages-of-perspectives-in-the-once-and-future-part-1
The Worlds Within a Singularity: Organising Voyages of Perspectives in The Once and Future - Part 1

The Worlds within a Singularity offers a glimpse into the varying perspectives and histories of the creative team behind The Once and Future, and the future voyages of the production following its premiere at SIFA 2022.

Drop 3
locating-ourselves-devil-s-cherry-as-a-negotiating-ground-for-histories-positionalities-and-daily-life
Locating Ourselves: Devil’s Cherry as a Negotiating Ground for Histories, Positionalities and Daily Life

Kaylene Tan and Paul Rae reflect candidly about the making of Devil’s Cherry, including their ongoing negotiation in acknowledging land and country, and their experience of creating a new transnational work across time and geographies.

Drop 3
queered-fabulations-worlding-bodies-in-project-salome
Queered Fabulations: Worlding Bodies in project SALOME

Kicking off the series of +DISCUSS talks was our first and only live conversation with Ong Keng Sen, creator and director of project SALOME, the first major work by Ong to be presented in Singapore since Trojan Women at SIFA 2017.

Drop 1
being-present-and-listening-tracing-the-past-present-and-future-ecosystems-of-ubin-and-drama-box
Being Present and Listening: Tracing the Past, Present, and Future Ecosystems of ubin and Drama Box

In Being Present and Listening, Koh Hui Ling, Kok Heng Leun and anGie seah collectively muse on the histories and desires behind the creation of ubin. They also speak eloquently about ideas of presence and futuring that they hope audiences will engage with through experiencing the work.

Drop 3
of-porous-time-space-and-bodies-the-rhythms-and-stories-of-remotes-x-quantum
Of Porous Time, Space and Bodies: The Rhythms and Stories of Remotes x Quantum

Of Porous Time, Space and Bodies offers a tender portrait of the two like-minded yet wholly different artists behind Remotes x Quantum, as well as their thoughts on the pandemic, ‘possession’ and their creative practice.

Drop 2
design-as-a-mirror-to-the-world-rituals-of-questioning-and-iterating-in-designing-for-sifa-2022
Design as a Mirror to the World: Rituals of Questioning and Iterating in Designing for SIFA 2022

What makes good theatre and art? In Design as a Mirror to the World, Randy Chan and Andy Lim speak about their key moments in their respective design journeys. They also reflect on the questions and rituals that are important to them in their designs for SIFA 2022 and elsewhere.

Drop 2
the-silhouette-of-provocations-costume-design-and-its-manifestation-in-sifa-2022
The Silhouette of Provocations: Costume Design and its Manifestation in SIFA 2022

In The Silhouette of Provocations, Max Tan shares his approach to fashion and costume design, and unveils the multiple layers of conversations that textured his processes of designing costumes for SIFA 2022.

Drop 2
luminous-visions-histories-of-the-unruly-in-the-neon-hieroglyph
Luminous Visions: Histories of the Unruly in The Neon Hieroglyph

At times rapturous, at times mournful, The Neon Hieroglyph presents a sensuous autofiction of ergot. In Luminous Visions, the multiple terrains and registers traversed in the work and its making are revealed—alongside the joys of dreaming and gathering for a different future.

Drop 1
the-sacred-everywhere-divining-bodies-and-rituals-in-ceremonial-enactments
The Sacred Everywhere: Divining Bodies and Rituals in Ceremonial Enactments

From the domestic and mothering body in Ang, to the public bodies of revellers and soon-to-wed in 293NW, to the worshipping bodies in Yantra Mantra, The Sacred Everywhere engages the three works that make up Ceremonial Enactments – and their creators – to explore how rituals and embodiments of the divine could be found around us.

Drop 1
+Discuss

A series of artist talks that lend insight to the creative process, moderated by Alfonse Chiu and Chong Gua Khee.

+Dream
+Eat
+Read
+Grow
+Discuss

LIFE PROFUSION

You have reached SIFA's virtual venue and creation platform
+Dream

Premiering on +DREAM is Lucy McRae's astounding performance film Delicate Spells of Mind, marking SIFA's foray into high-profile commissioning in the digital arena and emphasising SIFA's commitment to the virtual space as a stage for inspired artistic creation

+Eat

Bite-sized virtual art and multidisciplinary performances pieces featuring local and international artists. Curated by Syndicate.

+Read

A series of written articles and creative responses exploring the artistry and ideas explored in SIFA. Curated by Hong Xinyi.

+Grow

Insight into individual artists' creative stances, strategies and perspectives.

+Discuss

A series of artist talks that lend insight to the creative process, moderated by Alfonse Chiu and Chong Gua Khee.